Solar eclipse will be viewable on May 20

The Sun will be nearly covered by the moon on May 20, in some countries people may only see a partial eclipse.

The sunrises and sunsets often fascinate people, but to those who live in the western United States and East Asia, there will be a special glow in a few days: the Moon will pass in front of the sun, leaving only a bright halo Light.

It has been almost two decades since a “ring of fire” was visible in the U.S.. To celebrate the end of that long run, some 30 national parks that are in the path of the eclipse have organized party for this.

The show will first start at dawn on Sunday in East Asia. If weather permits, millions of people who get up early in southern China, Taiwan and southeast of Japan will see the formation of the stellar ring.

Then, the eclipse will tour the Pacific and the western United States and come the bright final. The ring will be visible from Oregon, northern California, central Nevada, southern Utah, northern Arizona and New Mexico, and finally in Texas, at sunset on Sunday.

For three hours, the stellar ring will follow a route of 13,679 km. Views will last about two hours from start to finish, although the eclipse of the ring last five minutes at most, depending on location.

Outside this narrow strip a partial eclipse will be seen in parts of western, central and southern United States and in parts of Canada and Mexico.

People in Asia are excited about the event. In Japan, there will be lifts at an early hour to give the tourists a panoramic view from the mountains. The boats make special trips for people to enjoy the show.

The Taipei Astronomical Museum will open at dawn and the Hong Kong Space Museum will place special telescopes outside its building.